Meg’s First Backpacking Trip

We own quite a bit of backpacking gear, much of which I’ve had since before Brooke and I were married when I’d go on trips over Spring Break in high school and college.  After we had kids, obviously, it got a little more difficult to be gone for multiple days  on trips without the family.  Thus, now that I’ve got a 7-year-old to indoctrinate in my interests, I thought this summer would yield an opportunity for a little daddy-daughter time out in the wilderness.

I hadn’t done much backpacking in Missouri, as most of my trips were to Tennessee and Arkansas (with a single trip to Colorado back in 8th grade).  The trails I’d done in Missouri were relatively far south and didn’t have much access to water.  In searching for “beginner backpacking trails” that would be suitable for a 7-year-old first-timer, I came across the Bell Mountain Loop Trail near Salem, MO, as part of Mark Twain National Forest.  The trail represented a 10 mile loop that had good overlooks, had access to water at least at one point, and was rated as relatively easy for beginners.

Before the yelling started…

Things started out pretty good, really.  In many ways, this is the most “in shape” I’ve ever been for backpacking, as the last time I did this, I was a good 30 pounds heavier.  Meg, of course, had gone hiking with us in limited settings, but never with this length of time, or overnight in the wilderness.

We got started on an Ozark Trail spur that would lead us to the Bell Mountain Trail Loop.  The OT section was mostly a dry creek bed, which isn’t great to hike on if you’re an adult, let alone a 7-year-old.  Meg and I had good hiking shoes on, so we were relatively fine, but it did get tedious, and we had to go slower than we otherwise would.  Still, we continue onward and upward until we hit the Bell Mountain Trail (or so we thought…).

Getting tired already…

We went for about as far as we could, but we were hoping we’d get to the main creek for our first night of camping, as it would provide some entertainment for Meg, and a solid water source to get us going the next morning.  We kept going as far as we could, but it was getting darker and we had already gone a good 4 miles with no creek in sight.  Meg was pretty tired (we didn’t start hiking until 4:00 pm, and there was a slight rain threat hovering about), and we were on a flat section of the trail that had some good camping spaces for our tent, so we went ahead and parked for the night.

Reading while Daddy packs up the tent…

The first night went remarkably well!  It dipped down into the low-50s overnight, but we were pretty warm in our tent.  We bought a 2-person Kelty backpacking tent, as traditionally, I’d always relied on a hammock and a tarp – something that doesn’t work quite as well for a 7-year-old.  The tent worked very well, so I think that purchase was well-founded.

Also, the macaroni and cheese I made for dinner that night went over pretty well with the kid. 🙂

Anyway, we kept hiking the next morning and still never ran across the creek.  We did spot a really nice overlook and took a few panoramic pictures with my phone.  We did eventually spot a fire pit that we thought we recognized from our map, so we continued onward.

Rollin’, rollin’, rollin’…

Eventually, we’d gone so far that it was getting late in the morning and we still hadn’t found water.  Not that we needed water right then, but we would need it for cooking later in the day, so I was getting a bit worried.  I was also very confused by a fork in the trail that shouldn’t have been there, at least according to the map.

Thus, we opted to turn around and start heading back.  We figured that there were some ponds we had passed that weren’t ideal for filtration, but could still be used to keep us going until we could get to the car the next morning.  We were also hoping to get moving relatively early the next day so we could hit up Heinrichshaus in St. James before getting to Marshall in time to pick up Calvin from school.

Anyway, we kept going for a few miles and, at this point, I was keeping an eye on my LTE signal so I could try and download a Google Earth file that would show us where, exactly, on the trail we actually were.

So, here’s what happened…

Basically, we saw that sign early in the trip that’s pictured at the top of this page, and it pointed to the left.  We also knew that we needed to take a left to head toward the Fire Ring indicated by the star above, as it would take us down toward Joe’s Creek for water (and there were two creek crossings on the map).  Well, we thought that sign was at the trail fork circled in red.  Instead, that sign was way before that, at the hairpin turn indicated by the red hexagon.

So, we took a left, but we were still on the OT spur and not actually on the Bell Mountain Loop yet.  When we got to the real turnoff, we just kept on heading straight and didn’t notice that there was another trail heading off to the left just over our shoulders.  Literally, there was a small orange flag that was practically impossible to see from the direction we were coming from.

So yeah, instead of eventually seeing the fire ring indicated by the star, we instead saw the fire rings that were actually on Bell Mountain, and the scenic views they entailed.  Also, based on my step tracker’s GPS, we ended up heading toward an entirely different parking lot before we turned around: the “extra fork in the road” we saw, we should have taken a left instead of a right.  Of course, we thought we were heading clockwise on the loop, but instead, we should have been going counter-clockwise.

Anyway, we had turned around, we figured this all out, and we kept trekking back to the car, knowing we wouldn’t cross the creek for water.  We pushed it quite a bit and ended up going 10 miles that way.

Meg was not happy about this.  There was yelling, there was screaming.  There was a lot of “I thought you said we were close!!!”  Technically, we were “close,” but considering that Meg had to stop literally every 2 minutes because her feet hurt, it was taking forever.

It came to this.

I even ended up carrying her backpack attached to mine in order to keep us moving. So yeah, my feet hurt, too, but she didn’t really care…

So yeah, we kept on going and eventually made it back to the car, where I had some water packed for our arrival.  We also drove to a nearby creek passing so I could filter some more.

Back in one piece!

It was quite a bit colder the next night, dipping down into the upper-40s, so that was a little less fun, but we still survived the night.  Meg hobbled along for awhile and didn’t really want to walk at all after we got to camp, though she was fine by mid-next day.

All in all, if you ask her about it, she’ll tell you she had fun with the camping aspect of the trip, but the hiking part wasn’t her favorite.  I think I can convince her to go again someday, but we may want to shake these memories a bit before I try again!

Ultimately, it was good to get backpacking again.  If I have to wait until Calvin’s ready, I can live with that.

Garden Update: Early June

So I took some pictures awhile back and apparently never posted them here.  These pictures are more recent, so I won’t bother showing how it all started when, you know, they were just dirt plots…  As stated in an earlier post, we’ve been busy!  Still, we got started relatively early this year and the weather was pleasant enough that we could get peas, carrots, lettuce and radishes planted (above).  We already picked the radishes and, while many of them turned out pretty good, others were left in the ground a bit too long (as evidenced by their thoroughly tough exterior…).

This is the most lettuce we’ve grown and it has turned out pretty well!  We’ve had weather in the 90 F range this past week, so we’re probably getting to the end of the line with lettuce, but the carrots aren’t quite done.  It’s about time to pick peas but, at usual, we aren’t expecting to get all that many.

We also switched up the locations of crops from last year, so now the green beans are closer to the house and a bit more shaded.  The mounds above with the greenery is watermelons, and the two mounds in the background are supposed to have pumpkins, but they haven’t sprouted all that much yet…not optimistic…  The peppers are positioned around the smaller trellis and we already lost a few of them, but the plants that are still there look passable

The tomatoes, on the other hand, are looking pretty solid.  Those plants took off pretty well, mostly because we didn’t rely on seed starts as much as last year, so they went in bigger.  We planted most of this the weekend before Mother’s Day, so they’ve had time to grow in the last few weeks.  Brooke did plant a few that she grew downstairs, but they didn’t take off as well as last year.  Hopefully we end up with a solid crop this year!

Lining the edges of this plot, we put in some soup beans.  Those are substantially larger than when I took this picture and they’re looking pretty good.  I’m hopeful they don’t decide to vine all the way up the tomatoes, ’cause that would be a huge pain…

Brooke expanded the herb garden, as well.  The sunflowers all came back as “volunteers” from last year, and our lemon balm plant also returned from last year.  Unfortunately, that was about it!  Otherwise, Brooke planted some other stuff like sage and, oregano, and some butterfly-attractive flowers.

The blackberries are also taking off quite nicely!  I may need to get a shotgun to fight off birds (and people) that may try to take them before they’re big enough…
Lastly, the trees all survived the winter and are growing well, especially the peach tree!  We even have a few peaches on there, but that’s the extent of the fruit we’ve observed.  The trees will keep growing this year and we’ll get some more stuff next year, we guess!

No Rest For The Weary

Starting a podcast…

Clearly, as the rate of posts here indicates, I’ve been pretty busy this semester.  Both of my classes this semester were courses I’ve taught before, but I had two of each for a total of four courses, with a combined 115 students.  Don’t get me wrong, it went fine and all of my grades were turned in on time this past Tuesday, but it got pretty busy, especially after Spring Break.

Good thing I’m off for Summer Vacation now, right?  Wrong!  In all honesty, I’m kinda excited because I’ll be teaching two classes in the online setting for the first time.  It’s new territory for me, as I’ve never taught a class in this way before, let alone two, so the learning curve could get the best of me, but I’m hopeful I can push them across the finish line by the time the classes are over in July.

Basically, back in the Fall, some of my students asked if I could teach Pathophysiology over the Summer semester.  It’s a class I’d taught before, but this time, it would be out of a different department and with a different course number and a different textbook, so it isn’t exactly the same (but, effectively, it’s the same class).  I was interested in doing it anyway, but the rub was that I’d have to do it in the online setting.  In some ways, it was “win/win” because I could still be flexible with staying home over the Summer with Meg, but I’d also get to keep busy and try something new with my courses, some things I could potentially wrap back around into my lectures for the Fall.  As of today, I’ve got 17 people enrolled in that class.

Earlier this semester, I was having conversations with “The Powers That Be” on campus about how many people are in my A&P courses (hint: it’s a lot) and they mentioned how it would be nice to get a fully online version of A&P I built to help transition students from the career center setting in nearby counties over to our nursing program.  This online A&P course could be completed by interested students and, assuming it was completed along with other prerequisites, they could enroll in our nursing program without having set foot on our campus before.

This presented a different challenge, as there’s a laboratory component involved.  I think I’ve solved that issue with a distance learning laboratory kit that we’ve contracted out from a supplier, but it’ll be interesting to see how the lab side of things works out compared with what I normally do during the Fall and Spring semesters.

Right now, I’ve got 15 people enrolled in that class, as well.

The thing I’m working on right now (aside from posting this…) is recording all of my lectures and getting them hosted on YouTube.  There are multiple ways to handle an online class and it really depends on a). the strengths (or weaknesses) of the instructor and b). what kind of material is being discussed in said lecture.  In my case, I’m no stranger to technology, so I picked up a USB microphone for $20 and grabbed Brooke’s sewing lamp from home in order to create a make-shift recording studio.  I’m also using Screencastify,  software built in to Chrome that lets me insert my voice and video in one of the four corners of my lecture slides and records the tab in Chrome into a video format stored on Google Drive.  From there, I can download it and edit it (to a very limited degree…), and then post it to YouTube in a Private listing so I don’t have everyone on the planet viewing it (and getting lovely YouTube comments about how little hair I have).

I’ve got hours of this…hours, I tell you…

Thus far, the lecturing has been working pretty well, I think.  I’m recording each lecture in 30-40 minute chunks and I started with A&P I material, as that’s what I’ve most recently done and, consequently, can get more “comfortable with the camera” as I have more confidence with those lectures.  I’ll get started on recording my Pathophysiology lectures next week, but after I get done with those, I’ve still got quite a few lecture slides to write in order to finish out the semester.

Luckily, Meg still has another week of school…  I’ve got my work cut out for me…

Calvin Said Something Funny

Just eating a popsicle… #nbd

We went to the Mexican place up the street a few weeks ago while Meg was at Kids for Christ and, while Brooke and I were having a conversation, the following ensued:

Calvin: “What’s a ‘teenager’?”

Brooke: “Well, a ‘teenager’ is a big kid. Like Cooper from church.”

Calvin: “Then what’s a ‘Ghostbuster?'”

After this, Brooke and I could barely contain ourselves, so we couldn’t really inquire further.  We can only assume Calvin equates teenagers with Ghostbusters, though how exactly Calvin learned of “Ghostbusters,” in the first place, eludes us.

Perhaps you had to be there…

Okee Dokee Artichokee

Train conductors? They can’t even drive yet…

We were trying to come up with something special to do for Meg’s birthday this year when Brooke happened to notice one of our favorite “family friendly” musical groups, The Okee Dokee Brothers, were coming to Kansas City.  The concert fell around Meg’s birthday, so close enough, right?

A bit of background: Brooke ran across their music 5 or 6 years ago and, though I can’t remember why exactly we listened in the first place (let alone how we discovered them…), my recollection mostly surrounds their fourth album, Can You Canoe?, which was inspired by their trip down the Mississippi River from St. Paul, MN to St. Louis, MO.  For Meg, it was a collection of creative and catchy tunes.  For Brooke and me, it was intelligently produced kids’ music that hearkened back to our own childhood experiences in this region, while also representing great bluegrass-style music.  That album went on to win the Grammy for Best Children’s Album in 2013.  They have since come out with two other albums, one inspired by their hiking trip on the Appalachian Trail, and another around their trip to the Rocky Mountains.

Thus, after church this morning, we went ahead and hit the road for Crown Center, where we ended up at Fritz’s again.  I think we waited a good 45 minutes to get into that place last year before going to Legoland for Meg’s 6th birthday, but this time, the line was considerably shorter (read: non-existent).  We were in-and-out relatively quickly and moved on to the Kansas City Folk Festival.

Seating was limited…

The event itself was pretty well organized, taking place at the Westin hotel in most of its various conference rooms.  Each show took place “on the hour” and ran for 45 minutes, and 5 or 6 shows were going on simultaneously, allowing listeners to move between rooms and get a good sampling of musical styles.  A substantial number of the acts were Spanish language-focused, which was very interesting musically, though difficult to deal with lyrically.  Still, Meg seemed like she was “bobbing her head” quite a bit, even if she didn’t know what exactly was going on.

The Main Event!

The Okee Dokee Brothers went on at 2:00 and were great.  In the picture above, Meg and Calvin are sitting on the floor just in front of the stage, so they had a front row seat to all the action.

This room was packed with families.  The organizers probably should have seen this coming, though to be honest, how all these people had heard of The Okee Dokee Brothers is beyond me.  Still, Brooke and I had to hold up a wall on the side of the room, with Calvin running back and forth from where Meg was sitting and where we were standing.  We weren’t next to Meg at all during the music, but we could see her copying the motions and singing along, as she knew many of the songs already.  So far as concerts go, they did a good job mixing their older stuff with their newer stuff, so that helped out quite a bit, as we haven’t listened to their newest album as much as their older ones.

It ended up being a fun time!  Not a particularly cheap experience, as were were also funding our “attendance” to all of the other bands that were there, but ultimately, I think we all agreed it was worth the trip.  The music was great, the experience was something different from what Meg’s used to, and it was an excuse to get out of the house for a day.

Win/win for everyone. 🙂

The “Half-New” Play Room

After setting up the new shared bedroom for Meg and Calvin, it was time to do something with Meg’s old room.  However, after putting a week into that new bedroom, I wasn’t really in the mood to scrape even more wallpaper, so it was decided that the second room would be turned into a play room.  In the interest of maintaining our sanity over this Christmas Break, we decided to leave the carpet and wallpaper for now and consolidate all of the toys into that room.

Well doesn’t that look cozy!

We now have another TV set up for the first time since living here and we have a Fire TV Stick on order to make it a little “smarter.”  The only station it gets over bunny ears right now is PBS, but we can live with that.  We’ve also got the Lego table set up in front of one of the windows.

The wall isn’t quite…”done”…yet…

Brooke had a crazy idea about the wall that will improve over time.  As the kids draw more pictures and do more “art” at school, it’ll get clothespinned to the string she put up for all to see.  The easel is also near two new tables we picked up from IKEA to replace the two we previously had, only this time, we put some chalkboard contact paper on it.

“Look, Mom! We can write on the table and erase it again!”

Honestly, I’m not quite sure how the contact paper will last on the tables, as they’re also intended for Play-doh and other things.  The idea was that roads and towns could be drawn on it for Legos, cars, etc.  We’ll just have to see how they use them…

Storage!

The last wall involved a purchase of a 9 cube organizer and some bins so we could put all those toys in a mostly central location.  Their Kindle Fires can be charged because of the port behind the shelves, so that’s where they’ll live and not in the bedroom (unless it’s during the day).  Hopefully we can foster some better habits that way.

It’s going to be a work-in-progress for awhile, but it’s more organized than before!  And now the Music Room downstairs has many fewer toys just lying around because they’re all upstairs!  There was also a “culling” of baby toys that the kids otherwise wouldn’t get rid of on their own, so this was a good opportunity for “Winter Cleaning.”

Review: Rogue One

Honestly, I wasn’t planning on seeing Rogue One: A Star Wars Story in theaters until I started seeing reviews and spoilers.  As a one off story that wasn’t a “numbered sequel,” it seemed like one I could skip.  Also, I wasn’t very familiar with most of the actors in it (aside from Forrest Whitaker).  Ultimately, I made the trip down to Sedalia to watch it in 3D (using their crappy 3D glasses…next time, I probably won’t even bother with that 3D system…).

The story serves as a transitional film between Episodes III and IV, centering on the group of rebels who steal the plans for the Death Star that allow Luke Skywalker to destroy it in A New Hope.  Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones) is joined by other rebels in an attempt to reach her father, Galen Erso (Mads Mikkelsen), who is a key figure in the science program tasked with building the Death Star.

First, the good: the movie is steeped with nostalgia.  Director Gareth Edwards does a great job replicating the 1977 Star Wars: A New Hope look, complete with 70s-era hair and prosthetics.  There are quite a few digital characters interspersed, but they generally looked great.  The sets also look dirty, which grounds the film in a sense of realism.  The dusty storm trooper helmets and dirty ships make the viewer feel as though there is history here, as opposed to a clean, sterile look.  As other reviewers have noted, the movie also does a good job of adding stakes to the Rebellion that weren’t really there in A New Hope.  You get a sense that these rebels are actually fighting for something, instead of some ethereal principle that was discussed in the Original Trilogy.

As far as the characters go, many of them do serviceable jobs, but there aren’t that many stand-out performances.  The only exception is Alan Tudyk, who voices the repurposed Imperial Droid, K-2SO.  He steals the show in any scene he’s in, providing just the right level of comic relief.

Also, spoiler: Grand Moff Tarken is in it.  Played by Peter Cushing.  Who died in 1994.  He shows up in at least 3 scenes and he looked gooooooood.  It’s kinda controversial that he’s in there at all, but having his interactions shown at the birth of the Death Star were invaluable to the story.

However, while some story beats were strong, others were quite weak.  The solution to getting the plans from the Scarif planet surface to the Rebel Fleet in orbit didn’t make much sense to me.  The convenience of having the daughter of the critical guy at the center of the Death Star Project (and why he’s so necessary is never explained) available to the Rebels.    The fact that Jyn Erso turns-on-a-dime from “The Rebellion Is Stupid” to “We Must Stop The Death Star At All Costs.”  The shallow character development of nearly all of these individuals in why it all matters (which, again, is addressed, but to do it right, more is necessary).

I enjoyed the movie, but I bet I could have waited to see it as a rental.  It does a good job of setting up A New Hope and provides a healthy amount of “Easter Eggs” for the most die-hard of Star Wars fans, yet those that aren’t really big fans of the series will find plenty of plot holes to pick apart.

The New Bedroom, Part II

Check out the previous post here…

So, the scraping started on a Tuesday and we were mostly done by that Friday, though we got slowed down by the kids getting released early from school due to weather.  That, and we were heading to my parent’s house for Christmas stuff that weekend.

As a brief aside, we were on the road to Columbia for 4.5 hours that Friday due to the weather.  That trip should only take an hour.  It was great fun.  Ug.

Gotta get all primed…

Anyway, after we got back from Columbia, we finished patching things up and finished scraping the walls so that, on Monday, I could prime everything and paint on Tuesday. We had to go with 2 coats of primer in most places, including the trim, and went with 3+ coats over the wallpapered section of drywall that was unscrapable.  We’re hoping the water-based paint doesn’t cause the paper to bubble up, but considering just how stuck it was to the drywall, we don’t anticipate too much trouble.  All the primer was enough to hide the floral designs underneath.

We went with an “off-white” color for the trim so we wouldn’t have to do the doors and windows quite yet…

The trim got a somewhat “off-white” color.  Bright white would have been preferred, but at this point, we really didn’t want to take the doors off the hinges or fight with the windows, so we figured this color would at least half-way match the doors/windows while still meshing well with the chosen paint color.

More of a blue-grey for the rest of the walls.

Like we did downstairs in the music room, Brooke went with a color that was approved by the National Historic Register.  The picture above still had wet paint, and the lights were off, but you can see the blue-grey hues pretty well.  We went with 2 coats of paint for most of the way around and, thankfully, it dried pretty quickly.

While we were doing the painting, Mom and Dad were downstairs assembling the twin-sized bunk beds so we could just carry them up the stairs when we were ready for them.  The room couldn’t really fit more than 3 people anyway, so it was a good way to divide and conquer.

Pulling the carpet up went remarkably well…

Once the paint was dry, we pulled up the carpet.  Dad and I did this the winter after we moved in on the landing to the top floor, so I drafted him into helping for another round.  The hardwood was very much intact, though the color differences between the middle and outside of the room was a bit odd.  Again, someday, we’ll re-finish the upstairs but, for now, rugs will have to suffice…

All done!

After carrying the bunk beds upstairs, laying down the rugs, and installing the new curtain rods and freshly dyed curtains (repurposed from those that were in the room to begin with, but now a darker navy color), we were all done!  We also moved Meg’s vanity (my grandmother’s, but painted last winter) into the room to give them a little bit of storage.

We’ve made it clear to the kids that this is a “sleep room” and not a “play room,” so with the exception of a few stuffed animals, no toys are supposed to be in the room.  Clearly, this is easier said than done, but we’re going to try and keep it that way for the time-being.  Hopefully that’ll stave off any markers on the walls for a few, er, days…

A view of the other corner…

Meg’s old bed was moved in and new sheets/blankets were added to match the bunk beds.  Obviously, the bed color is different, but oh well…  It’ll serve as a good guest bed should we need one!

Calvin enjoying his new big-kid bed!

Calvin was at school while we got all this done, so he was pretty excited to lay in his new bed!  He had a toddler bed after his 2nd birthday and, while he still fit in it, the twin sized bed is substantially larger!  He’s slept in big beds already, but this new spring mattress should be a bit more comfortable.

Meg’s up in the top bunk!

Meg’s up on the top bunk, as she’s the older kid.  Eventually, we can relax for Calvin, but for now, he won’t be sleeping up there.  We’re doing our best to keep him off the top bunk unless a grown-up is upstairs to monitor their play time, but again, this is easier said than done…

We’re pretty pleased with what we were able to accomplish in about a week!  It certainly went faster than the music room did!  And help from Mom and Dad was greatly appreciated!

Now, the play room…eventually…

The New Bedroom, Part I

Here’s what we had to work with…

So, Calvin’s been sleeping in a room with creepy quetzals (or some other bird…I’m not an ornithologist) since we moved in, but we’ve left it up until we could decide what the long-term plan was for the bedrooms, and also because we had other projects on the docket first.  A few months ago, the kids started sleeping together on weekends and, for the most part, they’ve done pretty well with this arrangement.  The idea of bunk beds came up at some point, so we all decided that the kids would share a bedroom for a few years, and the other room would serve as the kid’s “play room.”  For various reasons, Calvin’s room seemed like the better choice for “sleeping,” while Meg’s substantially larger space would become the “play room.”

It begins.

As we already knew, plaster was behind the wallpaper.  Some parts of it were cracked, necessitating patching with plaster and joint compound, but there wasn’t substantial damage to the plaster like we had down in the music room.

There were 3 layers of wallpaper in total, as well as an old border that was running along the top.

In this image, you can make out the green-ish wallpaper underneath the “quetzal paper,” as well as a border along the top.

The scraping wasn’t as bad as it could have been, honestly.  It took at least 4 solid days of scraping (largely completed by yours truly), but again, it could have been far worse.  The dust got pretty bad, but we kept the carpet in for the time-being to let it “soak up” the debris so we could remove it later.

We did run into a little issue on one wall, though…

…a little hiccup…

I started scraping it and the material underneath the wallpaper was quite a bit different than the other walls.  This is the one that was on the bedroom door side of the room.

…yup…that’s drywall…

With a little more investigating, it turned out that, somehow, drywall had been used on that one wall.  It’s possible that the wall had previous damage to the plaster, so the owners had to replace it with 1950s-era drywall, and then wallpaper over the whole room at that time.  Indeed, there was only the top layer of wallpaper covering that wall, so the whole room was done at the time the wallpaper was put on.

There’s a special place in Hell for people who wallpaper over joint compound…

On the wall adjacent to the drywalled…er…wall…we also ran into some large patches of joint compound that were directly wallpapered over, which slowed things down considerably.  I ended up scraping off a layer of joint compound in a few spots…

Ready to prime!

After I got scraping done, Brooke came back through with vinegar water to clean off remaining glue, and then worked her plaster magic to patch the walls.  You can see in the corner all the wallpaper that had fallen onto the carpet, so it was great fun tracking bits of trash throughout the house for a few days…

The rest will appear in another post.  That’s enough pictures for now!

For the second part of this project, click through.